I'm not sure which Windows Update causes this issue but it changes the associations for a number of extensions causing quite the problem.  A system restore failed and I was left to hunt for a solution.  Searching around, I found a number of options but nothing solved the problem until I came across the following Powershell one-liner:

    Get-AppXPackage | Foreach {Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register "$($_.InstallLocation)\AppXManifest.xml"}


    While hunting through 15,000 lines of CSS, I wanted to find and replace some text.  I thought it was going to be a simple task but there were numerous references and using 'find next' was getting tedious.  I dropped to a command line and used sed to complete the task.  Sed is a stream editor and the syntax is simple:


    You have a website, you want to protect it from attacks, and you hide it behind a web application firewall (WAF).  If your site was already public and you move it behind a WAF, bad actors can find your site.  Depending upon which WAF you're using, your site's actual location could also be discovered regardless of whether it was previously public on another server.  And if you're not locking down access to the site exclusively to the WAF, bad actors can attack your site without the protection of the WAF.


    Nikto is a great tool for scanning web servers for vulnerabilities but if you look at the logs, you can see its footprint:

    "Mozilla/5.00 (Nikto/2.1.6) (Evasions:None) (Test:Port Check)"

    ...which makes it simple to block. To change Nikto's user agent, we open the configuration file found in /etc/nikto.conf


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