For whatever reason, you might find yourself in a situation where you need to disable IPv6.  For me, it was to troubleshoot a problem being caused by IPv6 being enabled.  Pretty simple solution provided by Microsoft:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929852

Read more: Disable IPv6

We migrated a web site from Windows to Linux and immediately upon viewing the site, we realized the majority of the images were broken.

In the world of Windows, filename.JPG equals the same as filename.jpg but in the world of Linux, these are not the same.

In the images folder, the filenames were listed in the uppercase form but in the HTML, the files were referenced using the lowercase form.

Read more: Linux Uppercase to Lowercase

It seems lately we've been doing a number of Exchange migrations and we're seeing the dreaded "Security Alert".  In a nutshell, the server has an internal name which does not match the external name to which the certificate was assigned.  When the Outlook client is remote to the server, everything works as it should.  But when the Outlook client is internal, the user receives the following error:

Read more: Exchange Certificate Security Alert

Among the many skills we possess, we manage a number of content management systems (CMS).  Our preferred CMS is Joomla and it seems there's always something I end up hunting down.  On a recent project, "Home" appeared on the frontpage of a client's site.  Initially, I thought it was a breadcrumb but after a little digging around, I discovered the source:

Read more: Joomla "Home" on Frontpage

It could be an obsessive compulsive trait or ... ah... who am I kidding.  I'm OCD and I have this need to clear the screen of anything that isn't part of my current process.  In Windows, the command is CLS, in Linux, the command is clear.  Pretty basic commands but in Linux there's a slightly fancier version which allows you to clear the line while in the midst of typing out a command by simultaneously pressing:

Ctrl L

Simple but helpful when you're in the middle of a long string.

Read more: Linux Clear Screen

I've been playing on an Ubuntu machine recently which was not set to automatically update.  The following commands will acquire the updates and install them.  First run:

sudo apt-get update

You will be prompted for an elevated account password which will then be followed by a list of sites, sources and packages scrolling up your screen.  At the end, you should see "Reading package lists... Done" at which point, run the following:

Read more: Manually Run Linux Updates